Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data

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Test Specifications/
Components

Firearm Used: Universal Receiver
Barrel Length: 24”
Twist: 1-8’’
Case: Hornady
Trim-to Length: 1.910’’
Primer: Winchester WLR

Remarks:

Developed in 2007 by Dennis DeMille and Dave Emary, the 6.5 Creedmoor is a shortened and improved 30 TC cartridge case that was inspired by the .308 Winchester design.  This short action design was created to maximize case capacity and a wide range of loading lengths, while still fitting in standard short action magazines.  With the correct twist barrel, the versatile 6.5 Creedmoor can take advantage of the wide range of bullet weights available in 6.5mm.  Reloaders should keep in mind that the 6.5 Creedmoor works best with medium to medium-slow powders such as H4350, Varget, Win 760, and RE-17.  The light recoil and adaptability of the efficient 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge has already proven itself in high power, precision rifle series and benchrest competitions.  Couple that with respectable barrel life and its intrinsic accuracy potential and you have a recipe for success which should insure its legacy for decades to come.

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INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

3-sierra-bullets-6-5-creedmoor-data
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

4a-sierra-bullets-6-5-creedmoor-dataINDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

6-sierra-bullets-6-5-creedmoor-data

INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

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125 Responses to Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data

  1. Frank Randall says:

    The 6.5 Creedmore is not the super case that will change anything for the better. It is loaded with a 1000 granules of media hype topped off with a 500 grain something new bullet. It will probably cause the demise of a perfectly sensible case known as the .260 Remington.
    It was developed by someone with something to sell. It will run its course and make a lot of people happy on the way. In the end some reasonable handloader will ponder reloading manuals of the future and think “why in the world didn’t they just neck down a .308 case?”

    Like

    • George says:

      The 260 is a 308 necked down . l don’t understand your last part of your statement.

      Like

    • Anthony W Rose says:

      Not being a Target shooter, I had the same response initially. Then I learned something and was no longer ignorant on the cartridge. You can’t load 147gr ELD bullets in a .260, at magazine depth, the ogive will end up inside of the neck.

      Like

      • Mitchell Maxberry says:

        So what ? Why are you not single loading the rifle . If its that big of a deal which its not increase the magazine length , yes you can on a M700 SA . And for gosh sakes why the 147 , I broke national records with the 139 gr bullets. So your saying the 147 has too long of a profile , then don’t blame the cartridge case .

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    • Kevin says:

      I shoot both and the 260 Remington outperforms the 6.5 Creedmore in every way I mostly use the 6.5 Creedmore for kids and guests that take hunting. I usually shoot the 130 grain Accubond from 260 and shooting the new Game Changer from the Creedmore. I will say the Game Changer performs really well on game. It doesn’t come apart as fast as the Nosler ballistic tip and the quality on hornady has been dropping off.

      Like

    • Mike says:

      I guess that’s why so many F Class shooters don’t use the 6.5 Creedmoor. Give in to the dark side, the new 153 grn A-Tip from hornady is gonna change the game.

      Like

  2. Mtchell Maxberry says:

    Yes and the magazine capacity is for a cartridge is predetermined to be 2.800 OAL , so the Creedmoor is suppose to be better, by reducing case capacity for the powder from the 260 Remington and using less magazine room that it has, otherwise wasted ,, ok . I have a blow up kids pool that you can play with, while I use the Olympic size pool so I can make bigger waves . Does not compute and has left Mr Spock befuddled …. Smaller is better , yea , duh !

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    • Anthony W Rose says:

      Those still ignorant on the 6.5 Creedmoor, astound me. The case capacity is not really reduce when you consider the case has less taper, you give up a whole 50 fps, while reaping the benefits of loading 147 ELD bullets, at mag length.

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  3. WOW ! Your replies are no doubt true , but its about selling guns and ammo. Its a new toy for grown-ups to play with. If the manufactures just sold the old standbys they would under. They need the rifle designs, new cartridges etc to stay afloat – and we NEED them .

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  4. Mtchell Maxberry says:

    Thomas I agree , its a failure of marketing on Remington’s part, “nothing new there” should be their motto. New cartridges come and go so fast that if you blink at the stop light you missed it altogether . Have re-chambered several 6.5X47’s to 6.5 Creedmoors for customers , next they will be going to the 260. Remington is missing the market again by not loading match grade ammo , I have to shake my head in disbelief at their losses , absolutely incredible their marketing dept is sitting on their thumbs .

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  5. Harold Bradshaw says:

    6.5 CM or 6.5 CRDMR for short, is a centerfire rifle cartridge introduced by Hornady in 2007[6] as a modification of the .30 TC,[7] which was based on the .308 Winchester.[8] It was developed in partnership by Hornady Senior Ballistics Scientist, Dave Emary and Dennis DeMille, the VP of product development for Creedmoor Sports, hence the name. The cartridge was designed specifically for long-range target shooting,[6] although it is also achieving success in game hunting.[7] Bullet for bullet, the 6.5mm Creedmoor achieves a slower muzzle velocity than longer cartridges such as the 6.5-284 Norma or magnum cartridges such as the 6.5mm Remington Magnum. However, due to its overall length of 2.825 inches (71.8 mm), it is capable of being chambered in short-action bolt-action rifles and AR-10 semi-automatic rifles.

    They left out the one of the most important parts and that is because of the case design, it allows longer higher BC bullets to be used in the short action, unlike the .260 or .308. I had lived and breathed the .308 until just by chance I became the owner of a custom built 6.5 Creedmoor almost a year before any could be bought off the shelf, but that is story for another day. Over the years I have built several rifles chambered in 6.5 Creed and shot it in competition with great success and have invested countless hours in load development. By the way, biggest single improvement I had with the Creed was when Laupa started making brass for it .
    I am saying all this to say, some of you guys may not like it, but the fact is, it is the real deal! People would not still be buying, building and shooting them if they were not ! If you looked at it with a open mind, you will see it does things the .260 and .308 will not, like shoot farther with more velocity and accuracy.

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  6. james p reed says:

    They are both, great cartridges. You don’t have to hate one to like the other, and if Hornady got more people to enjoy shooting with marketing, great. I hope they come out with a new pistol cartridge, P.S i’m a 260 Remington lover, and 308, and 223, and 30-06, and 243 win,

    Like

  7. James Reed49 says:

    Sorry I forgot 7mm-08, 280 reminbton , 300 win.Mag, even 22OR

    Like

  8. Doublegunner says:

    The Creed is not faster than the Swede or the 260 when all are loaded with the same bullet, barrel length, and to the same pressure level.

    Like

  9. Frank Green says:

    The US Army just a year ago to two years ago tested some where around 30+ bullets in 6.5mm. They tested .260 Rem. and 6.5 Creedmoor. They tested both large primer pocket and small primer pocket cases in both rounds as well. Testing included velocity and accuracy from 100m out to 1k yards and it might even have been 1200 yards. In the end there was no clear bullet that flat out performed another (147gr Hornady’s and 150SMk where not available at the time in fact when testing started the 147’s just had come out when the bullet testing was started) ‘when it came down to the .260 and 6.5CM again they said one didn’t have an advantage on one over the other. They tested barrels in 1-7 twist and 1-8 twist.

    How do I know we made a vast majority of the ammunition pressure test and accuracy test barrels and quite a bit of the data was shared with us.

    That being said I do have guns in both .260 Rem. and 6.5CM as well as 6.5×55 and I like them all.

    Later, Frank
    Bartlein Barrels

    Like

  10. I bought a 6.5 Creedmoor chambered rifle recently. And it was in spite of the hype, not because of it. The reality as I see it is that .260 will never get its due because Remington as the sponsor company is awful. It’s a little like how a kid with all kind of promise never realizes it because his parents are losers. Remington hasn’t had a solid new product introduction in forever. And what they have introduced has been terrible (pistols, mostly).

    Hornady has momentum. Their products are all over the shelves now– ammo, loading components and tools, etc.

    Lapua making brass sealed the deal for me. Now I can load super-premium match ammo in Lapua brass, or I just buy some nasty White box. 6.5 ammo is very common where I live. Not as common as .243 or .308, but common enough to make the difference irrelevant.

    6.5 is the “tastes like chicken” caliber. Ballistically, it’s just a swedish mauser in a short action that can launch high BC bullets. But it turns out, that’s an excellent sweet spot to be in.

    The 6.5 continues to gain popularity after more than a decade. If it was going to fizzle out, it would have done so by now.

    6.5 is doing to .308 what .308 did to 30-06, only without the benefit of military adoption. That alone is impressive.

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  11. Joaquin says:

    As a long-time silhouette shooter, I have used the .308 Win., 7mm BR, 7mm-08 Rem., 6.5 X 47 mm Lapua cartridges and I am now going to the 6 x 47mm Lapua. I know what my Remington M-700, Winchester M-70, switch-barrel rifles chambered in 260 and 6.5 Lapua, as well as my Sako AII hunting rifle chambered in 6.5 Lapua, are capable of, in terms of velocity and long range precision.

    For a number of years I had ignored the 6.5 CM, since, for metallic silhouette shooting, as well as hunting, it is no better than either the Remington or Lapua 6.5mm cartridges. I bought a second-hand, almost pristine Remington 700 SA PRS recently, in 6.5 Creedmoor strictly out of curiosity and as a new toy. I am currently developing loads for it with H4350 and H4831 SC powders and a stash of moly-coated Hornady 140 grain A-Max bullets. To make sure I compare apples to apples, the loads will be close to full power, so I can make an accurate comparison with the same loads for the other calibers. ALL my silhouette loads are developed for optimum accuracy and a muzzle velocity of approximately 2650 fps, which offer the best combination of good trajectory, precision and knock-down energy on the 500 meeter, 50 lb. rams.

    Keeping an open mind to see if all the hoopla about this cartridge, other than its COAL making it fit in just about any short action magazine, is true or not.

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  12. Roger Bratt says:

    I have an Aero upper 6.5 Creedmoor, 24 inch heavy barrel. It does not like 2/3 of the loads suggested by Hodgdon reloading. It goes Over-Pressure. The key to getting it working was sticking to slow-burning Magnum powders like 4831. Even 4320 resulted in OP marks on the brass.

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